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Meng Jie 孟節 is a fictional character who appears in chapter 89 of the fictitious 14th century novel Romance of the Three Kingdoms as a wise older brother of Meng Huo 孟獲.

BiographyEdit

Meng Jie was the older brother of the Nanman King Meng Huo and Meng You 孟優. He lived a life of reclusion close to the Shu-Han borders.

When Zhuge Liang's men got ill from King Duosi's poisonous marshes he was worried to his campaign might result in a failure. At that moment Zhuge Liang met a recluse who told Zhuge Liang his name:

I am Meng Huo's eldest brother, my name is Meng Jie.[1]

Zhuge Liang startled, but Meng Jie explained:

Do not be afraid. Let me explain. We were three brothers of the same parents, the eldest being myself. Our parents are both dead. My brother Meng Huo, being headstrong and vicious, has never been amenable to culture. I have talked to him many times, but he kept his own course. Finally, under an assumed name, I retired to this spot. I am ashamed for my brother's rebellion, which has put you, Oh Minister, to the trouble of making this expedition into a barren country, but it has given me the privilege of seeing you. For my responsibility in this I deserve to die a thousand times, as I own to your face, and I beg your pardon.[1]

Meng Jie also warned Zhuge about the four poisonous springs and the mist. He also provided the Shu-Han troops with a certain kind of herb. Each soldier only needs to put a piece of leaf from the herb in his mouth, and will not be affected by the poisonous mist.

Zhuge Liang was grateful to Meng Jie. He managed to win this fifth battle against Meng Huo and ultimately managed to win him over to his side.[1]

NotesEdit

Fact vs. FictionEdit

Historically...

  • ...Meng Jie did not exist.
  • ...nothing is known about Meng Huo's family. It's not known if he had any brothers, sisters, children or a wife.
  • ...King Duosi was a fictional character and the events surrounding him and his poisonous springs did not occur.
ReferencesEdit
  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 Luo Guanzhong, Romance of the Three Kingdoms, chapter 89

SourcesEdit

  • Luo Guanzhong. Romance of the Three Kingdoms. Trans. C. H. Brewitt-Taylor. New York: Tuttle Publishing, 2002.

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